Oracle Online

Editor answers criticism

Deborah Sesser

April 9, 2007

Filed under Opinion

Last week, Tyler Broyles, a student who submitted an opinion for publication in the Oracle last week, posted a comment in the online version of the Oracle claiming the Oracle has been unfair and biased in its inclusion and editing...

Running from the Exes…

EZ Peterson

April 9, 2007

Filed under Opinion

I was standing in the card aisle at Wal-Mart looking for some stranger's words tacked on to a card that could closely articulate my heart's thoughts to a close friend. She was getting married and my heart and I had a lot of thing...

Alumnus calls for researc on scholarship promise

David Sesser

April 2, 2007

Filed under Opinion

In light of several editorials that have recently appeared in the Oracle, I felt that it was time that someone looked at the facts concerning the El Dorado/Murphy Oil Scholarship Promise. Dr. Stephens, who wrote a response to the o...

Student defends administration, Murphy Oil Promise

Tyler Broyles

March 26, 2007

Filed under Opinion

It has come to my attention that many students on campus are appalled about the announcement regarding the matching of the Murphy Oil Promise Scholarship fund. Their concerns are based on the following premises: 1. Henderson has, i...

Faith in a nutshell

Daniel K. Thomason

March 5, 2007

Filed under Opinion

Charles Spurgeon, a Baptist preacher, once said, "We shall not adjust our Bible to the age; but before we have done with it, by God's grace, we shall adjust the age to the Bible." These words resonated over 100 years ago and remain as relevant as ever. The Baptists have practices that can be traced back to the traditions of the early Christians in the Book of Acts. While all Baptists adhere to the same major theological principles, variances still occur from church to church. Baptist churches operate on the Congregational Governance system. Many of said variances will occur within this autonomy given to the local individual churches. My particular denomination is Missionary Baptist. The mission given to God's people in the Bible is that of spreading His Word. One of the unique facets of this Church is its policy on the funding of missionaries. In the Southern Baptist churches, for example, each church is part of a collective group that gives the money to a centralized office. The money is then dispersed without the churches' knowledge of its specific destination. Missionary Baptists adopted a policy that would allow the individual church to disperse the money as they saw fit, ensuring that it gets where it needs to go. Now, I am not implying that Southern Baptist churches' missionary funds do not reach a needy destination as well; rather, I prefer my church's procedure because it allows for help in the local community as well as abroad. Also incurred in this autonomy are the differences in the church's covenant, or mission statement. Most Baptist churches concur on a believer's baptism as a "sacrament" or "ordinance" of the church that, according to doctrine, plays no role in salvation since baptism is properly performed only after salvation. Some churches use the following acrostic backronym to summarize their distinguishing beliefs: • Biblical authority (Matthew 24:35; 1 Peter 1:23; 2 Timothy 3:16-17) • Autonomy of the local church (Matthew 18:15-17; 1 Corinthians 6:1-3) • Priesthood of all believers (1 Peter 2:5-9; 1 Timothy 5) • Two ordinances (baptism and the Lord's Supper) (Acts 2:41-47; 1 Corinthians 11:23-32) • Individual soul liberty (Romans 14:5-12) • Separation of Church and State (Matthew 22:15-22) • Two offices of the church (pastor and deacon) (I Timothy 3:1-13; Titus 1-2) Growing up, I had the privilege of having a grandfather who was a Preacher. I remember overhearing numerous debates on religious issues and having no idea what was being said, but I never once felt as though I was being pulled into this religion without a choice. Most parents who attend church want their children there as well, and rightly so. I will not lie: as a kid, there are few things more uncomfortable than a church pew. But sometime between the innumerable thumps on the back of the head and the pinches on the leg, I began to understand and take interest in what was being said. I believe that there is justification by faith alone (sola fide) and that it is by grace through faith alone that Christians receive salvation and not through any works of their own (see Ephesians 2:8). I, like most others, view my faith as sacred and above all material problems. The doctrine of "priesthood of all believers" states that every Christian has direct access to God and the truths found in the Bible without the help of an aristocracy or hierarchy of priests. This holds invaluable in my mind. I have witnessed firsthand what a new preacher with unsound doctrine can do to a church: destroy it from the inside out. Humans are flawed creatures born with a sinful nature, and it is up to the believer - through careful and deliberate study of the scriptures - to distinguish between sound and unsound doctrine in a Church. At the end of the day, you have to make the decision - no one can make it for you. I am a Christian first - my choice, my faith and my free will are simplistic in essence. Trust in God, because you are accountable to no one but Him. Send us your "faith in a nutshell." E-mail your beliefs to oracle@hsu.edu in a Microsoft Word document, and you might be featured next week in our segment on various faith systems on campus.

Editor responds to Murphy Oil scholarship, Arkansas Times

Deborah Sesser

February 26, 2007

Filed under Opinion

Until this point, I have chosen to remain silent in regard to Henderson's unspoken focus. However, after reading an article by Doug Smith in the Arkansas Times on Feb. 15, 2007, I feel the need to finally say something. Smith p...

Father shares daughter’s last thoughts, faith

Rick Smith/Megan Smith

February 19, 2007

Filed under Opinion

Rick Smith wrote: On Jan. 5, 2007 I experienced the most devastating nightmare that could have entered my mind. Megan, my only child, was killed in an automobile accident. She was 17 years old and a junior at Arkadelphia High...

Cut it out

Holly McCauley

February 12, 2007

Filed under Opinion

Two weeks ago our newspaper featured an article about two students who are traveling the country to speak out against injustice based on sexual orientation. Someone in Sturgis took the time to cut out that single article from ...

College Essentials

Deborah Sesser

February 5, 2007

Filed under Opinion

If you enjoy all of those nifty gadgets and accessories that make life more enjoyable and sometimes downright entertaining, then read on. This column is dedicated to finding and reviewing items that will amuse you and enrich your time spent in college. Best of all, you can decide whether an item is worth the fuss before spending your own hard-earned cash. *** Up for review this week is "The CollegeHumor Guide to College." The guide has chapters entitled 'Parties,' 'Finance,' 'Greek Life,' 'All Things Home,' 'Sex and Dating' and more. Released in April 2006, this humorous guidebook provides some interesting insights into college that usually takes several years for incoming students to attain. For instance, CollegeHumor writers discuss how to find the perfect Greek organization as well as which ones to avoid. It provides this practical advice: "When joining a sorority, it is important to meet as many sisters as possible.then it is important to throw all that knowledge out the window and make your decision based purely on that sorority's nickname." All aspects of college life are given a humorous twist; no individual or group is exempt from the witty anecdotes and stereotypes scattered throughout the 349 page hardcover edition. While the book acts as a guidebook with helpful information, it does so in an interesting manner, making use of parody so individuals who dislike reading will still enjoy thumbing through it. Each chapter can be read on its own, without adhering to the order listed in the table of contents, and there are several illustrations, pie charts and humorous informational graphics. For those students who are mathematically challenged, the book offers a simple formula for ordering enough beer and pizza for a get-together. Or, for those students more interested in academics, there are translations of class titles and guides onhow to determine a professor's personality type. The Guide is perfect for first-time freshmen who want to get an honest yet comical heads-up about college life. Veteran college-goers will enjoy re-experiencing episodes of their college career, and seniors can take a part of college with them as they learn to move on to 'Life Beyond College.' The book is well-written, entertaining, and worth passing on to new high school graduates and fellow students. True to the nature of the material published on the collegehumor.com website, "The CollegeHumor Guide to College will keep you laughing."

Wht do U thnk about txt msgng?

Michael Taggard

February 5, 2007

Filed under Opinion

Click, click, clack. You know you have done it. You might not own up to it, but you have tried it.Text messaging - it's everywhere. You may be a flaky sorority bimbo with your pink RAZR sitting on the front row texting all of yo...

Cross barred from chapel

Associated Press

February 5, 2007

Filed under Opinion

WILLIAMSBURG, Va. - Vince Haley, a Catholic, often went to Mass at the College of William and Mary's historic chapel as an undergraduate in the 1980s. Also a Catholic, school President Gene R. Nichol often slips into the 120-s...

Writer recalls the ‘Dream’ of Dr. King

Elizabeth Levin

January 22, 2007

Filed under Opinion

I can still remember it. We had come to Washington, D.C. and were visiting the monuments and museums. We had been to the Air and Space Museum, where we'd looked at a space capsule and watched the film about the Enola Gay. We'd been ...

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